PIRG outlines 10 steps Whole Foods can take right now to move beyond plastic

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Aaron Colonnese
Content Creator

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Content Creator

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.

Actions speak louder than words. That's the message PIRG and our supporters are sending to Whole Foods, the grocery giant that, when it comes to plastic waste, isn't living up to its environmentally friendly reputation.

On Jan. 3, PIRG released a detailed list of 10 steps Whole Foods can take right now to stop being a part of our country's plastic pollution crisis and instead become part of the solution. Among the most effective (and most urgent) actions: eliminating plastic produce packaging, embracing reusable options, and being more transparent about packaging use.

"For the second year in a row, Whole Foods has received a failing grade in a report of corporate policies to reduce plastic waste," said Juliana Clejan, Zero Waste campaign associate for PIRG. "Over the past year, we’ve gathered almost 80,000 petition signatures from Whole Foods shoppers who care about their health and the environment and want the store to eliminate single-use plastic packaging."

"If and when Whole Foods steps up and heeds the public's call for change, it will both make a huge impact on our plastic waste crisis right now and encourage others in the industry to follow suit."

Read more.

Learn more about our campaign to move Whole Foods beyond plastic.

Photo: Throughout the summer of 2021, organizers with our partner group MASSPIRG and other state PIRGs across the country hit the streets to talk to people in their communities about moving Whole Foods beyond plastic. Credit: Staff

Aaron Colonnese
Content Creator

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Content Creator

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.